Boko Haram Suicide Bomber Kills 11 at Mosque in Cameroon

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Yaoundé – A bombing attack by the Boko Haram terrorist group has killed at least 11 people in a mosque in Cameroon.Officials said on Thursday that the bombing had occurred the night before, when an assailant detonated his explosives as people were breaking their fast at a mosque close to the Nigerian border.Four other people were injured in the blast. According to Cameroonian authorities, close to 1200 people have been killed ever since Boko Haram started attacking the Far North region in 2013.Since 2009, the Boko Haram insurgency has left 20,000 people dead and 2.3 million displaced. read more

Brace yourself This is how much it will cost you to put

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MONTREAL — The cost of a four-year university degree for a child born in 2013 could rise to more than $140,000 due to tuition inflation, a new study says.But three-quarters of parents with children under 18 haven’t made a detailed estimate of the total cost of post-secondary education, said BMO’s Wealth Institute in a report released on Wednesday.Tuition and other costs for a four-year university degree now can cost more than $60,000, the report said.“I think that for most people if you tell them that tuition has increased two or three times the rate of inflation they will be surprised at that,” said BMO’s Caroline Dabu.This can leave parents unprepared for the costs and students with hefty loans to pay back when they graduate, Dabu said from Toronto.Over the last five years, the average annual inflation rate has been 1.6% while tuition inflation was 3.9%, the bank said.It also noted that at the beginning of the 1990s, average undergraduate tuition fees in Canada were $1,464 and they’ve risen more than three-fold to $5,581.Parents often see college or university as a long way off for their children, said Dabu, vice-president and head of BMO’s wealth planning group.“The top mistake is not starting early enough.”The report also found that 83% of parents expect to pay for their child’s college or university costs, with 44% expecting their child will also contribute.“Let them know you’re saving for their education and have them involved in how you’re saving,” Dabu said.If students have a part-time job, parents could have a portion of earnings go toward post-secondary education to help them understand budgeting, she added.Only half of parents have set up a registered education savings plan (RESP), said the inaugural report by the bank’s newly created Wealth Institute, called: “Student Tuition and Debt on the Rise: RESP’s and Beyond.”The report also found that only 34% of parents were taking full advantage of the available government grant for RESPs.The BMO report also recommends parents consider using tax free savings accounts, trusts, corporate dividends and life insurance policies to help pay for post-secondary education.“The advice we give to clients is very similar as to what we give around retirement, and that is to start saving as soon as possible,” Dabu said. read more

Stock markets rally as investors find reason for confidence in US budget

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AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email TORONTO – Traders showed they still had some optimism for the economy as stocks moved higher Wednesday in the first trading session since the U.S. Congress agreed on measures to avoid the so-called “fiscal cliff.”The S&P/TSX composite index closed 107.24 points higher at 12,540.77, while the TSX Venture Exchange was ahead 18.54 points at 1,239.84.The Canadian dollar rose 0.99 of a cent to 101.50 cents US.On Wall Street, the cliff aversion triggered a rally with the Dow Jones industrials jumping 308.41 points to 13,412.55.The Nasdaq rose 92.75 points to 3,112.26 and the S&P 500 index gained 36.23 points to 1,462.42.The budget deal, reached just before midnight Tuesday, left several issues unresolved and it was unclear how long markets would be lifted by the agreement.“The last couple of weeks people were starting to worry whether or not this thing would even get done, and the fact that we did avert the fiscal cliff has put people in a good mood and a buying mood,” said Sadiq Adatia, chief investment officer of Sun Life Global Investments.But Adatia said the positive momentum of traders will likely be tested in the coming sessions.“I don’t think this rally will be long lasting, but it does help the start of the year.”The bill that Congress approved calls for higher taxes on incomes over $400,000 for individuals and $450,000 for couples, a victory for President Barack Obama. Earnings above those amounts would be taxed at a rate of 39.6 per cent, up from 35 per cent. It also delays for two months $109 billion worth of across-the-board spending cuts that were set to kick in this week.Though fiscal cliff fears have eased, investors still have a host of issues to worry about — not least the prospect of more debates over unresolved longer-term U.S. budget issues.The next major debate will involve what is known as the debt ceiling — which is essentially how much the government is allowed to borrow. President Obama has said he will not negotiate the issue.In commodities, oil prices rose with the February contract on the New York Mercantile Exchange ahead $1.30 to US$93.12 a barrel.The TSX gold sector was higher as the March bullion contract moved ahead $13 to US$1,688.80 an ounce. Copper prices for the March contract were up 8.4 cents to US$3.74 a pound.Metals and mining stocks were the biggest gainer, rising 3.8 per cent. Teck Resources (TSX:TCK.B) was up $1.35 to $37.50.Shares in Petrobank Energy and Resources Ltd. (TSX:PBG) fell 91 per cent in the first trading day since the company completed a major reorganization.The company, now referred to as New Petrobank, announced on Monday it had completed the spinoff of its 57 per cent stake in PetroBakken Energy Ltd. (TSX:PBN), a light oil-focused company. Its stock closed at $1.17, a drop of $11.23.BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion (TSX:RIM) shares fell 23 cents to $11.57 as reports surfaced that Apple may be testing its next iPhone model and operating system with a mid-year release target. by David Friend, The Canadian Press Posted Jan 2, 2013 4:32 pm MDT Stock markets rally as investors find reason for confidence in US budget deal read more

Valeant has no plans to boost offer for Allergan to offset lower

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MONTREAL – Valeant Pharmaceuticals (TSX, NYSE:VRX) says it sees no need to raise its offer again for Allergan, even though the Botox maker’s refusal to negotiate has hurt the Quebec company’s share price and reduced the value of its bid.Chief executive Michael Pearson said Tuesday that he expects Valeant’s share price will recover as it takes its offer directly to Allergan shareholders and bidding partner Bill Ackman of Pershing Square Capital Management pushes for a special meeting to vote on the removal of some Allergan directors.“It’s artificially depressed now but if we stay the course, if we have a path to getting this deal completed which we do and as time marches on, I don’t think that’s going to be an issue at all,” he said during a conference call to address once more what it considers are misconceptions about the company.Valeant has offered US$72 cash plus 0.83 of a Valeant share for each share of Allergan (NYSE:AGN). At Tuesday’s closing price of US$118.87, up $1.12, that would value Allergan’s shares at $170.66, making the offer worth some US$50.78 billion based on Allergan’s 297.56 million shares outstanding. That’s down from more than US$180 per share when the company boosted its offer May 30.Allergan stock closed up $1.16 at US$160.53 on Tuesday.Pearson told analysts his company’s shares have been hurt by the “noise” coming from Allergan, which has repeatedly questioned the sustainability of Valeant’s business model and its financial results.Valeant increased the cash component of its offer, hoping Allergan’s board would agree to negotiate. But Pearson said he suspected from Valeant’s initial bid that the transaction would ultimately have to go directly to Allergan’s shareholders.“It is clear Allergan’s management and our board will never sit down and act in the interest of their shareholders,” he said, adding Valeant believes the vote would overwhelmingly support the takeover.“We have a clear path to get this vote. And we are both determined and patient. Time is on our side.”California-based Allergan (NYSE:AGN) has repeatedly spurned Valeant’s offers as underpriced and risky.Valeant (TSX:VRX) said proxies seeking support for its bid could be mailed in “the near-term,” but Allergan will likely try to delay the vote as long as possible.Pershing Square Capital, which controls 9.7 per cent of Allergan’s shares can call for a special meeting to remove directors once it has support from 25 per cent of shareholders. If directors are removed their replacements could be elected about two months later, setting the stage for negotiations.Pearson questioned why Allergan wouldn’t push for an early vote if it was so confident of having its shareholders’ support.“The fact that they’re doing everything possible to delay this shows that they are not optimistic in terms of getting to the actual shareholder vote, so I’m sure there will be lots of noise but at the end of the day we are very, very confident that the shareholders will vote in the favour of this deal and we’ll be very, very patient because our business is performing extremely well.”He said more than 50 per cent of Allergan’s shares have been traded since news of Valeant’s bid surfaced April 21. A significant number are owned by hedge funds and arbitrators who bought at a high price and are interested in a transaction.Valeant’s shares gained $3.57, or three per cent, at US$121.32 on the New York Stock Exchange. They were up to $130.83 in Toronto. Allergan’s shares gained $2.77, or 1.7 per cent, at US$162.14 in New York.Follow @RossMarowits on Twitter Valeant has no plans to boost offer for Allergan to offset lower share price AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by Ross Marowits, The Canadian Press Posted Jun 17, 2014 10:34 am MDT read more

Interest rate hike could prolong Toronto housing market slowdown Economist

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by Jessica Smith Cross, The Canadian Press Posted Jul 12, 2017 11:01 am MDT Last Updated Jul 13, 2017 at 8:40 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Interest rate hike could prolong Toronto housing market slowdown: Economist TORONTO – The Bank of Canada’s interest rate hike could prolong the cooling-off period the Toronto housing market is experiencing following the implementation of a provincial foreign buyer tax, a prominent economist said Wednesday.But the recent drop in the number of home sales in the Greater Toronto Area — down 37.3 per cent in June from the year prior — is not expected to last long-term, said Benjamin Tal, deputy chief economist with CIBC World Markets.A similar slowdown occurred in the Vancouver area — another hot housing market — following the implementation of British Columbia’s foreign buyer tax a year ago, but Tal said the measure hasn’t deterred non-resident buyers and the market is rebounding.“We haven’t seen a significant decline in foreign investment activity in Vancouver following the tax,” he said. “What led to the slowdown was really more domestic buyers waiting to see what the tax will do.”While Toronto should follow a similar trajectory, there are two other factors now at play, Tal said.“We also see interest rates going up and the regulators are talking about introducing more measures to slow down the market,” he said. “That’s why it’s possible the slowdown in Toronto will be more durable than the slowdown in Vancouver.”The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions has proposed tighter rules that include requiring a qualifying stress test for all uninsured mortgages.While Tal said he supports the changes, he cautioned it might be prudent to reconsider the timing of their implementation, which is currently set for the fall.“Just not to shock the market too much, maybe we have to think twice about the timing of the changes,” he said.That advice doesn’t apply to Bank of Canada’s decision Wednesday to raise its key interest rate to 0.75 per cent from 0.5 per cent, he added, considering the many different economic agendas at play.The Ontario government released new data Wednesday that show foreign buyers were involved in seven per cent of residential real estate transactions in Toronto and nine per cent in York Region, a suburb north of the city, between April 24 and May 26, the month following the introduction of the foreign buyer tax.Tal said the figures show foreign homebuyers are having “non-trivial” impact, pushing up home prices in Toronto and surrounding areas, but added Canadian demand remains more dominant.“They also impact, indirectly, other regions, like Hamilton, Kitchener and even Barrie, because you have all those Toronto refugees who are impacted by that inflation caused by foreign buyers,” he said.The foreign buyer tax was one of 16 housing affordability measures the provincial government announced in April, including expanding rent control, allowing Toronto to impose a tax on vacant homes and using surplus provincial lands for affordable housing. read more

Follow Chinas example shut down ivory factories and shops UN agency urges

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The move, announced by the country’s State Forestry Administration, represents the first concrete steps in an “almost complete” ban on the domestic trade in ivory. It was announced last year and expected to be fully implemented by the end of 2017. “This is an historic step and may well be a turning point in our fight to save elephants from extinction,” the Executive Director of UN Environment Programme (UNEP), Erik Solheim, said in a news release issued late last week.“The true measure of the success of these new rules will be how well they are enforced,” he added. According to UNEP, the closures on 31 March represent the end of business for around one-third of officially sanctioned ivory-carvers and licensed retailers in one of the world’s largest markets for the sale of ivory, where elephant tusks are used to make decorative objects and as traditional gifts or displays of wealth. With 100,000 elephants killed in the last decade alone and only around 500,000 left worldwide, bans like this cannot happen soon enough. Mr. Solheim also pledged to work closely with the Chinese government to ensure a healthy natural legacy remains for the world’s children and grandchildren. Lower prices mean fewer poachersAlso, following the announcement of the ban, ivory prices have fallen by almost two-thirds and public awareness campaigns have played a key role in reducing the demand. These mean that the killing of elephants for their tusks and illicit trade of the ivory is not as lucrative as it once was. Such legislation, enforcement and a change in public attitudes will not only protect wildlife but also benefit people who live in the countries where elephants are found. Furthermore, combatting illegal trade in ivory helps the fight against corruption as well as helps curb the funding that finance the activities of criminal gangs.What’s good for the elephants is good for everyone. read more

Guyanese society in crisis

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Guyana Foundation wants more done to tackle social ills News of the heinous act committed against a young teenaged boy in Berbice has no doubt stirred widespread public outrage. It has also highlighted the need for more action to be taken at all level to prevent such situations from recurring.As such, the Guyana Foundation – a local non-profit organisation focusing on mental health issues – has called on the Ministries of Public Health, Social Protection and National Security to make urgent and bolder efforts to safeguard citizens in communities across the country, saying that recent crimes of child rape and familial homicide are clear indicators that all is not well and the situation will continue to worsen if no action is taken.“We are calling on these Ministries to work together to come up with a battle plan as to how they intend to lift up our communities to stop this senseless loss of lives. Make your plans public, people want to know, people want to help and the Guyana Foundation is willing to assist in any way possible,” the organisation said.Founder of the Guyana Foundation, Supriya Singh-BoddenIt pointed out that the counselling work it has been conducting in Essequibo alone showed that the mental state of Guyanese was extremely fragile. The Foundation offers free counselling six days a week at its centre as well as assist with counselling at the Suddie Hospital. These counselling sessions – counselling for depression, suicidal thoughts and counselling for survivors of suicide – give psycho-social support. Each case is confidentially logged according to gender and age.According to the entity, being involved in this groundwork puts it in a position to say that the numbers are increasing steadily.“It has forced us to strengthen our resolve to deal with these issues by going door to door in communities in Region Two. We can no longer wait for persons to come to us. That is how bad it is. We do not have the capability to blanket the Region, because we are a non-profit organisation,” it stated.Moreover, the Guyana Foundation has engaged television stations to reach out for volunteers and the response has been good. It has also started walkabouts in Charity and that work will continue from village to village. However, the lack of resources is hindering the scope of work that needs to be done.“We have also been making efforts to network with representatives in the Region from the various Ministries. This is still in a fledgling state. The personnel and the resources attributed to this Region in particular are woefully inadequate. The framework within which these Ministries that have been functioning for so many years need to be improved urgently to meet the changing needs in the communities,” the Foundation noted.It went on to say that it has conducted workshops with health workers and Police Cadets to facilitate the sharing of whatever knowledge they have on how to deal with some of these social ills. It added that it was alarming that some of the first responders enquired how they could get counselling, since many of them had suicidal thoughts.“What this tells us is that to bring healing to our communities, pinned down by poverty for so many years, we have to work together.”In calling on the relevant Government agencies to institute bolder protection mechanisms, the Foundation said: “The people of Guyana are sickened by what is going on…How have we fallen to the level where children are being sodomised, women and children being beaten to death, young men and women ingesting poisons to die is the stuff that fills our news reports…”The Foundation noted that there were countries that could and were willing to help, as well as other international NGOs that can bring their resources and experience to Guyana and assist in addressing these societal ills. The religious bodies – Christian, Muslim, Hindu and others – are willing to help if they are given the right signals from these Ministries, the organisation further stated.In the meantime, the Guyana Foundation says it will continue to strengthen and expand its work in communities and is inviting citizens to go out and volunteer with the organisation. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedEmergency meeting on suicide prevention convened – President says suicide rate disturbingJanuary 7, 2016In “Health”Op-Ed: Violence Against Women, a national crisis being neglectedApril 25, 2018In “Opinion”Public Health Ministry wants elephantiasis eradicatedOctober 26, 2016In “Health” read more

Arch sees dynamic coal markets in 2008 and beyond

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first_imgArch Coal says US coal markets are dynamically responding to the scarcity of coal in the global landscape. With severe supply constraints in traditional coal export nations, including flooding in Australia, power outages in South Africa and coal shortages in China and India, Arch believes that US coal increasingly will be valued for purposes of supply diversification.Arch estimates that coal imports into the US were essentially flat in 2007, as supply – primarily from South America – was diverted into higher-priced seaborne trade. Over the same time frame, US coal became the swing supply for the global market. In fact, Arch estimates that US coal exports grew by close to 10 Mt in 2007, and conservatively expects another 20-Mt increase in 2008.Pricing for international metallurgical and thermal coal has been robust, and has positively influenced pricing in key domestic coal markets. Central Appalachian coal index prices increased an average of 34% in 2007, and have reached the $70/t mark for second quarter 2008 delivery. Likewise, Powder River Basin coal index prices increased more than 50% in 2007, and have approached the $15/t mark for second quarter 2008 delivery.These domestic price increases have been supported by positive supply and demand trends in US coal markets. On the supply side, Arch estimates that domestic coal production declined more than 16 Mt in 2007, with more than half of this decline occurring in Central Appalachia. Looking ahead, Arch continues to expect significant geologic and regulatory challenges in Central Appalachia to constrain production in this region.On the domestic demand side, US electric generation grew by close to 3% in 2007, according to statistics compiled by the Edison Electric Institute. Arch estimates that coal consumption for power demand in the electric power sector increased nearly 20 Mt last year – compared with a nearly 11 Mt decline in 2006 – driven by relatively average economic growth and more favourable weather. During the first half of 2008, Arch expects slower growth in electric generation demand driven by a weaker US economy, but forecasts US coal consumption for the full year to exceed that of 2007.Arch estimates that US generators held approximately a 51-days supply in stockpiles at the end of 2007, compared with a 50-days supply at the end of 2006. Arch continues to believe that increased stockpiles, nearly all in the West, stem in part from an effort by US generators to increase inventories as a hedge against future supply disruptions.“2007 was a transitional year for U.S. coal markets,” said Steven Leer, Arch’s Chairman and CEO. “With increased coal consumption and reduced production levels, the market was able to essentially rebalance itself. Looking ahead, we foresee a dynamic coal market in 2008, with robust international coal demand providing the catalyst for further strengthening in domestic coal markets. While expectations for a US economic slowdown remain a concern, normal weather trends and strong global markets are driving price levels to new highs.”Furthermore, Arch estimates that 14 GW of new coal-fuelled capacity are now under construction in the US, representing the addition of roughly 50 Mt of new annual coal demand. These identified plants will be phased in over the next four years, with roughly one half expected to start-up by the end of 2009. Another 8 GW – representing more than 30 Mt of additional incremental annual coal demand – are in advanced stages of development. Arch expects the majority of these plants to be built during the next five years.“We believe that building new coal-fueled generation capacity is the right answer for America, as it provides us with affordable, reliable and secure domestic energy for decades to come,” continued Leer. “At the same time, we believe it is essential to increase investment in technology that can make coal use in this country and around the world cleaner, more efficient and more climate-friendly.”last_img read more

Official Clyne joins Bournemouth on loan

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first_imgAFC Bournemouth have completed the loan capture of defender Nathaniel Clyne from Liverpool.The former Saints right-back will remain at Vitality Stadium until the end of the 2018/19 season and is eligible for Saturday’s FA Cup third round tie against Brighton & Hove Albion.Clyne, 27, began his career at Crystal Palace before a move to Southampton in July 2012 followed by a switch to Liverpool.He told afcbTV: “I’m really excited by this opportunity. It’s a great chance for me to come and play football.More great news 👏@Nathaniel_Clyne joins us on loan until the end of the season. Welcome!#afcb 🍒https://t.co/CwDEJg2JJm— AFC Bournemouth (@afcbournemouth) January 4, 2019AFC Bournemouth v Manchester City - Premier LeagueMatch Preview: Bournemouth vs Manchester City Boro Tanchev – August 24, 2019 English champions Manchester City travel to Bournemouth for their encounter of the third Premier League Matchday.“I’ve spoken to the manager and we’ve talked about what we can achieve for the remainder of the season. It’s a great club with a great story. I can’t wait to get going.”AFC Bournemouth manager, Eddie Howe, said: “Nathaniel is vastly experienced and has the benefit of being able to play in a couple of positions for us.“With Simon Francis’ injury we felt it was important to bring someone in, capable of filling that void, and it’s great to have Nathaniel on board.“Naturally, he wants to play football and is very keen to bring his attributes to the team. We’re excited about what he can deliver for us.”last_img read more

Add the Roku TV Wireless Speakers to your living room for 14999

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first_img Now playing: Watch this: 2:16 Share your voice The Cheapskate Roku releases five new TV streamers, and the cheapest… 0 Preview • Roku TV Wireless Speakers now shipping, $50 off Black Friday deal Review • Roku TV Wireless Speakers are the simplest audio upgrade we’ve ever seen Read more: The best sound bars for 2019CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! center_img Tags Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Roku Sarah Tew/CNET Got a Roku TV? Sure, the interface is great, but what about the audio? As a general rule, flat-screen TVs fall short in the speaker department.Late last year, Roku introduced a solution — albeit a pricey one. If you’ve been hoping for a sale, hope no more: For a limited time, and while supplies last, the Roku TV Wireless Speakers are $149.99 shipped. Regular price: $199.99. This is the best deal since Black Friday.See it at RokuThat’s the good news. The bad news is that this two-speaker setup works only with Roku TVs. But if you have one, you’ll enjoy a huge improvement in dialog and music quality.That’s according to CNET’s Roku TV Wireless Speakers review, which you’ll definitely want to read. It correctly notes that a sound bar might be the better option for some people — but if you’ve been eyeballing this option, here’s your chance to save 25 percent! Roku TV Wireless Speakers Speakers Post a commentlast_img read more

Toyotas ready to pour that sweet GRMN performance on the Corolla hatch

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first_img Share your voice More From Roadshow Tags 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 2019 Toyota Corolla Hatchback is a welcome addition Hatchbacks Performance Cars Toyota 1center_img 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Comment 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 49 Photos Enlarge ImageImagine this, but with way more horsepower. Dope, right? Andrew Krok/Roadshow There was a time when fast Toyotas seemed to grow on trees. The brand’s lineup was packed with sporty cars, hot versions of regular cars and even world-beating technological terrors that had the folks in Germany feeling very nervous.Sadly, those days are mostly gone. The only things that Toyota offers that are remotely sporty are the 86 and now the Supra, but that could be changing, according to a recent interview with a Toyota exec conducted by the Dutch publication AutoRAI.See, word around the campfire is that Toyota is going to extend its GRMN line of hotted-up vehicles to the already-quite-good Corolla hatchback. This means the hatchback would get more power and ideally retain its manual transmission.If GRMN isn’t an acronym with which you’re familiar, fear not. It stands for Gazoo Racing Masters of the Nurburgring (we know, cringe-worthy) and it’s an acronym that has graced the backsides of some of our favorite offerings from the “bean wearing a sombrero” brand for the last few years.According to the AutoRAI interview, the Corolla GRMN will come after the appearance-only Corolla GR and will feature some saucy, non-hybrid drivetrain. Toyota Deputy Chief Designer Toshio Kanei told the Dutch journalists that a “four-cylinder turbo engine with an engine capacity of about 1.6 liters can be interesting.”We haven’t been lucky enough to get a GRMN-badged model yet in the US, not even the Yaris GRMN (which really hurt our feelings, Toyota), but because the Corolla is already a US model and available here with a manual, who knows, maybe it could happen? Toyotalast_img read more

Wild food and its role in Alaska culture

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first_imgBerry picking, salmon fishing and preparations for fall hunting are in full swing and Alaskans are putting up food for winter. Whether canned, dried, fermented or smoked – wild foods go hand in hand with the culture and traditions of the north.Download AudioSalmon drying on a fish rack. Photo: KNOM file.HOST: Lori TownsendGUEST:Suanne Unger, author, Qaqamiigux: Traditional Foods and Recipes from the Aleutian and Pribilof IslandsLeslie Shallcross, UAF Cooperative ExtensionJulia O’Malley, journalist and Alaska foodieLINKS:UAF Cooperative Extension Office (with information on food preservation safety)National Center for Home Food Preservation – an info-depot on all things related to food safetyPARTICIPATE:Post your comment before, during or after the live broadcast (comments may be read on air).Send email to talk [at] alaskapublic [dot] org (comments may be read on air)Call 550-8422 in Anchorage or 1-800-478-8255 if you’re outside Anchorage during the live broadcastLIVE Broadcast: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 at 10:00 a.m. on APRN stations statewide.SUBSCRIBE: Get Talk of Alaska updates automatically by e-mail, RSS or podcast.TALK OF ALASKA ARCHIVElast_img read more

Kodiak art project encourages salmon discussion

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first_imgChildren write responses to fisheries-based questions. Kitty Farnham sits far right. (Photo by Kayla Desroches / KMXT)The first cohort of Alaska Salmon Fellows is wrapping up its pilot year with final projects.The program brings together different innovators in the state, from policy makers to artists, and prompts them to start discussions about the salmon industry.Listen nowLocal Salmon Fellow Anjuli Grantham organized one recent art event at the Baranov Museum as her final project.The museum and its partners invited the public to see a slideshow of artists whose work reflects the relationship between Alaskans and salmon.People gather on the museum grounds. A projector plays a slideshow on a screen outside. It’s perfect weather for an event like this – not raining hard, but just overcast enough to keep people in town instead of out camping or hiking.A salmon Fellows organizer has made it in for the occasion.Kitty Farnham is the director of leadership programs at the Alaska Humanities Forum, which organizes the program. She wore an Alaska Salmon Fellows jacket which featured an icon of colorful fish.At the beginning of the event, Farnham explained all 16 Salmon Fellows are doing projects in their particular areas, like education, history or policy.“Being the Humanities Forum, we’re really looking at it though the people lens, and all the data in the world is valuable, but without having the relationships between people in different sectors, there’s really no way to address solutions that don’t become embroiled in win-lose, and we’re looking for solutions that really work across our communities,” Farnham said.After wandering in, some people stopped in the yard to chat and a couple play a game called corn hole, aiming bean bags at a hole in a board. The sacks thump against the wood.This is the kind of gathering Salmon Projections aims for. Farnham said the project is meant to spark conversation.“There’s some parallel projects around looking at management systems, relationships between organizations and the official regulating bodies, education,” Farnham said. “Really also trying to change the narrative from one of we can’t agree on, you know, a sense of zero sum game and allocations to what’s best for our communities and for our salmon.”On the porch, attendees snack on sushi.Just inside the building, seaweed salad and smoked salmon are available alongside tea bags and a samovar full of hot water. By the end of the night, the platter of salmon is empty.That’s one thing most people who attend have in common. No matter what their relationship to the fishing industry, they usually eat fish.And they tend to agree that the larger aim is to keep the fisheries healthy and strong.Sports fisherman Brent Pristas said the state should focus on industry sustainability.“I think we keep doing what we’ve been doing,” Pristas said. “As long as we value it and place a proper emphasis on the salmon over other kinds of development, I think it will continue.”Ginny Austerman, a longtime Kodiak resident, said the local fishing industry needs community growth.“Things like cold storage and more processing plants and jobs for local people are very important as well as making sure that there’s fish for next year,” Austerman said.Rita Stevens agreed it’s important to build up local infrastructure.“Like improve the dock situation for the boats and the storage of boats and the dry dock and having repair shops here instead of having to go down to Seattle [and] take the business away from Kodiak,” Stevens said.The museum encourages more conversations like these by setting up pieces of paper covered with questions about fisheries and sustainability and asking people to scribble their responses.The Salmon Fellows will convene again in a couple of weeks. Farnham said they’re recruiting now for the next round of fellows, and the application period opens at the beginning of the year.last_img read more

CoOperative Department official his brother in ACB net

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first_imgVisakhapatnam: Deputy Registrar and Divisional Co-Operative Officer, Cooperative Department Boina Mosha and his brother Boina Mallikharjuna Rao were nabbed by the Anti-Corruption Bureau officials on Tuesday. Mosha was caught by the ACB when he was demanding bribe for registration of a plot, measuring 200 square yards near Veterinary Colony near ACB office, to register the same in the name of his brother. The accused demanded a bribe for doing a favour to Rongali Simhadrappa. The accused were arrested and produced before the ACB Court.last_img read more

Congress to give 50 pc of tickets to BCs Muslims

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first_imgHyderabad: Accusing TRS government of doing utter injustice to the Backward Classes in Telangana State, Telangana Pradesh Congress Committee (TPCC) President and MP N Uttam Kumar Reddy on Sunday announced that the Congress party would give 50 per cent of tickets to BCs and Muslims in the next municipal elections. Addressing the preparatory meeting on municipal elections at Sangareddy, Uttam Kumar Reddy strongly condemned the TRS government for slashing the reservation percentage for BCs. Also Read – Warrant issued against Renuka Chowdhury in cheating case Advertise With Us However, he said that the Congress party would not allow Chief Minister K Chandrashekar Rao to suppress the BCs by denying them their due share in municipal elections. He directed all Congress workers to hold dharnas at all district headquarters on July 23 in protest against the injustices being done to BCs by the TRS Government. Uttam ridiculed the claims being made by the BJP about its strength in Telangana. He said there was no space for the saffron party in Telangana State. He said BJP had secured only 7 per cent of votes in the recently held elections. Also Read – Parts of Hyderabad witness heavy rainfall Advertise With Us The TPCC chief also condemned the TRS government for discrepancies in fixing the new boundaries for municipal wards and errors in the reservations. He said even the High Court has found the procedures adopted by the State Government to be incorrect. He described the new Municipal Act as an insult to the people of Telangana and said it goes against the spirit of democracy. He directed the party workers to organise party flag hoisting programmes at a massive scale in all municipal areas from July 27 to 30. Advertise With Us He said the programme should be organised with the slogan “Intintiki Congress, Vaada Vaadallo Congress Janda”. He expressed confidence that the Congress party would win majority of seats in all 140 municipalities. The TPCC Chief demanded that the State Government immediately sanction a medical college for Sangareddy. Further, he said that the party was fully supporting the agitation by MLA Jagga Reddy seeking supply of Godavari water for Sangareddy. Earlier, addressing the meeting, AICC Telangana Incharge RC Khuntia said that the new Municipal Act was full of errors and it was detrimental to the interest of people of Telangana. Senior leaders including CLP leader Mallu Bhatti Vikramarka, TPCC Working Presidents Kusuma Kumar and Ponnam Prabhakar, AICC Secretaries Bose Raju, Saleem Ahmed, Vamshichand Reddy and A Sampath Kumar, former PCC President Ponnala Laxmaiah, former ministers Mohammed Ali Shabbir, J Geetha Reddy, TPCC office-bearers, DCC Presidents and Municipal presidents were present in the meeting.last_img read more

Narayanganj bus plunge kills 2

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first_imgRoad Accident logoAt least two people were killed and 20 others injured when a bus drove into a ditch in Mollikerpar area on Dhaka-Chittagong highway in Sonargaon upazila of Narayanganj on Wednesday night, reports news agency UNB.The identities of the deceased could not be ascertained immediately, said Kanchpur highway police station officer-in-charge Abdul Kaium Ali Sardar.A Comilla bound bus of Tisha Paribahan plunged into a roadside ditch while the driver lost control over the steering around 10:00pm, leaving two people including a female passenger dead on the spot and 20 others severely injured.The injured were taken to the nearest upazila health complex from where five were referred to Dhaka Medical College Hospital considering the severity of their injuries, the OC added.The driver and helper of the bus fled the scene soon after the accident.last_img read more

Author Carter Administration Is Most Underappreciated Of The Last Century

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first_img 00:00 /12:42 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Stuart Eizenstat says the presidency of Jimmy Carter was the most underappreciated of the last century.He has a unique perspective, at the very least, having served as President Carter’s Chief White House Diplomatic Policy Adviser. He also served in the Clinton and Obama administrations.He has a new book about the Carter presidency called President Carter: The White House Years.Eizenstat will discuss the Carter administration’s role in the Middle East peace process at an event tonight at Houston’s Congregation Beth Israel. And he’ll speak Tuesday night at an event with Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.In the audio above, Eizenstat discusses the Carter presidency with Houston Matters host Craig Cohen.Courtesy Stuart EizenstatStuart Eizenstat served three presidents and is the author of President Carter: The White House Years. Listencenter_img X Wikipedia CommonsPresident Jimmy Carter. Sharelast_img read more

MIT Hackers Transform Great Dome Into Caps Shield

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first_img “Hacking” is a long-standing tradition at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.But MIT’s hackers don’t hide behind a computer screen: Rather, they are pranksters, tricksters, and creative inventors responsible for some of the most daring high jinks.Including the recent transformation of the school’s Great Dome into Captain America’s iconic shield.As reported by the Boston Globe, dozens of people worked on the project, born about a year ago—around the time Marvel announced its final Avengers film.The current generation of MIT students have grown up with the comic hero franchise, and the giant shield serves as a symbol of their “gratitude toward the series,” the Globe said, citing an anonymous hacker.“Putting things on the dome is a big challenge,” the prankster said, choosing to remain nameless due to the secretive nature of the larks. “We hope people look at it and it gets their imagination going.”MIT did not immediately respond to Geek’s request for comment.We may never know exactly how a group of students draped the university’s signature Great Dome with a giant cloth shield.We do know, however, that they spent “a lot of time” on the task, and put safety first.“The priority is safety for people, and safety for MIT structures,” the jokester said, following the institute’s informal hacking guidelines (so ingrained in the school’s history that they’re listed in its handbook).Aerial views of the shield are provided by Raymond Huffman, a sophomore at MIT, who flew a drone over campus on Sunday to capture the Marvel-ous prank (video above).“It was super exciting to see it in the morning all set up,” Huffman told the Globe, adding that he was not directly involved in organizing or executing the hack, but filmed the result after being tipped off over the weekend. “Everyone thinks it’s awesome.”Including Captain America himself—Boston native Chris Evans—who tweeted his appreciation this week. Very cool! https://t.co/jMQEPtnQdu— Chris Evans (@ChrisEvans) April 29, 2019MIT students have been “hacking” the McLaurin Building’s 150-foot-high Great Dome for decades, often commemorating popular culture and historical topics.When they’re not placing erroneous objects—a campus police car, piano, model Wright Brothers plane, fire truck, replica Apollo Lunar Module—on top, they’re transforming the structure into a propeller-topped beanie, R2D2 head, Red Sox logo, and rainbow pride flag.More on Geek.com:‘Avengers: Endgame’ Smashes Box Office Records With $1.2 Billion OpeningFly the Ol’ Red, White, and Blue With This Captain America Gift GuideIron Man Was Completely Right (‘Avengers: Endgame’ Spoilers) MIT’s AI Knitting System Designs, Creates Woven GarmentsMIT, IBM Train AI to Create and Edit Fake Images center_img Stay on targetlast_img read more

First transgender recruit joins US military following Trumps ban

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first_imgGAYSTARNEWS- A soldier in the US military in Hawaii. | Photo: Flickr/Dvidshub In the wake of Donald Trump’s transgender military ban last summer, and the complicated months that followed, the first trans recruit joined this month. eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) This new TV ad demands Donald Trump drop his trans military banUS military ‘preparing to accept transgender troops’ after court ruling on Trump ban45 senators urge block of Trump’s trans military banRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/transgender-recruit-military/center_img However, it is still unknown what the recommendations are or what a new policy would look like.Regarding the recommendations, Eastburn said they came from a ‘private conversation between the secretary and the White House, and the contents will remain private’.If it is another form of the ban, there will undoubtedly be push back again. Some reports indicated the Pentagon would recommend allowing trans troops, but they have not made the official information public.A proud dayWhile the future may be unclear, Matt Thorn, President & CEO for OutServe-SLDN, called this a ‘proud day’.‘We have worked exhaustively to witness this day because we know, as everyone has come to know, that any qualified individual who meets the standards of our armed forces should be allowed to serve regardless of their gender identity,’ he continued.Thorn also acknowledged that though this is a victory, the fight is not over. Not until the ‘Trump-Pence Administration fully retreats from their bigoted pursuit’.Ashley Broadway-Mack, President of the American Military Partner Association, also expressed pride in a statement.‘We are incredibly proud of this young trans American for stepping up to serve our great country, even as Donald Trump shamefully attempts to stop them from serving.’Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… The Pentagon confirmed the news to CNN.Major Dave Eastburn said: ‘The Department of Defense confirms that as of February 23, 2018, there is one transgender individual under contract for service in the US Military.’The unnamed recruit met all the standards and signed a contract, but has not begun basic training yet.Transgender recruits were allowed to join again starting 1 January, after a federal judge forced the Pentagon to allow applicants.Trump first announced his ban in July, which he followed with an August memo. However, numerous judges began halting Trump’s ban.What happens now?Though transgender recruits are able to join, it may only be for now.Last week, the Pentagon made new recommendations to the Trump administration regarding transgender personnel. This followed a judge’s reveal that Trump’s team would be revealing a new policy after courts blocked the original.last_img read more

Carestream DRXTransportable Field Portable System Rugged and Reliable for Military Settings

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first_imgSponsored Content | Videos | Digital Radiography (DR) | September 19, 2012 Carestream DRX-Transportable / Field Portable System Rugged and Reliable for Military Settings FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Carestream’s DRX – transportable / field portable X-ray unit is designed and tested for the rigorous conditions of military, disaster and remote locations. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Information Technology View all 220 items Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Recent Videos View all 606 items Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Carestream DRX-Transportable / Field Portable System Rugged and Reliable for Military SettingsCARESTREAM DRX-Transportable _ Field Portable System Rugged and Reliable for Military SettingsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:24Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:24 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Technology Reports View all 9 items Find more SCCT news and videoslast_img read more