Tennis News Australian Open 2019: Simona Halep to face Serena Williams, Novak Djokovic guarantees top spot

first_imgNovak Djokovic assured of World No.1 rankVenus Williams eliminated from Australian OpenSerena Williams to face No.1 Simona Halep Melbourne: World number one Simona Halep set up a headline last 16 showdown with Serena Williams by beating her sister Venus as Novak Djokovic’s relentless drive towards more Australian Open glory cranked up another gear. On day six at Melbourne Park, the Romanian finally hit form to pull off her best win of the year and cruise past the veteran American 6-2, 6-3. “I was super-motivated today,” she said after being taken to three sets in both her opening two matches as she bounces back from a herniated disc that ended her 2018 season early. “I have nothing to lose,” she added, looking ahead to Monday’s clash against 23-time Grand Slam winner Serena. “I playing against a great champion. Its’s going to a bigger challenge but I’m ready to face it.” Williams crushed Ukrainian Dayana Yastremska 6-2, 6-1 before consoling her at the net as the teenager burst into tears.     The ominous 37-year-old, seeded 16, has dropped just nine games in her three matches so far on her first return to the tournament since winning it in 2017 while pregnant.  “I just play each match at a time, play as hard as I can and do the best I can. That really is all you can do,” she said as she zeroes in on an eighth Australian title and a record-equalling 24th Slam crown. For all the Latest Sports News News, Tennis News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Fourteen-time Grand Slam winner and top seed Djokovic is gunning for a record seventh Australian title. He dropped a set for the first time this year against fast-rising Canadian Denis Shapovalov, before demolishing him in the fourth stanza to win 6-3, 6-4, 4-6, 6-0. “I just tried to be in the moment and weather the storm,” said the Serb, who was unsettled when the lights were switched on in Rod Laver Arena for television reasons, despite it still being daylight.              “Completely unnecessary to turn on the lights,” he said in roasting the organisers. Djokovic’s victory means he is guaranteed to stay world number one when the new rankings are released after the tournament.         He next plays another up-and-coming star, Russia’s 15th seed Daniil Medvedev, who eased past David Goffin and has yet to drop a set. Another young gun Alexander Zverev made the last 16 for the first time when he swatted aside Australian Alex Bolt in three sets and will play former world number three Milos Raonic for a place in the quarter-finals.Fourth seed Naomi Osaka looked down and out against Taiwanese veteran Hsieh Su-wei before battling back to win 7-5, 4-6, 6-1 and set up meeting with Latvia’s Anastasija Sevastova.         ‘Die or win’       Osaka’s win equals the 21-year-old’s best performance at the Australian Open, where she reached the last 16 in 2018 but lost to Halep. But she looked headed for the exit when she conceded the first set and was down 4-1 in the second, before winning five straight games to force a decider.  “I just didn’t want to give up,” said the Japanese, who received a code violation after throwing her racquet.       Sixth seed Elina Svitolina struggled with a painful shoulder complaint that required treatment at every changeover, and medical timeouts, before she somehow beat China’s Zhang Shuai 4-6, 6-4, 7-5 as the temperature rose in the centre court sunshine. “I just told myself ‘you’re going to die or win’,” said Svitolina, who scored her biggest career win by clinching the WTA Finals in Singapore last October.               She will next meet 17th-seeded American Madison Keys. Eighth seed Kei Nishikori made it back-to-back victories for Japan, following Osaka on court by beating Portugal’s 44th-ranked Joao Sousa in three sets. The 29-year-old has won all three of his first week matches on Margaret Court Arena to reach the last 16 for the seventh time in nine appearances.    “I love to play this court,” said the 2014 US Open finalist after delighting a large contingent of Japanese fans. He next plays Spain’s 23rd seed Pablo Carreno Busta. highlightslast_img read more

Syracuse football player file No. 2: Chris Slayton

first_img Related Stories Syracuse football position battle to watch, No. 1: Backup quarterbackSyracuse football preseason storylines, No. 1: How Syracuse adapts to Dino Babers’ spread offenseSyracuse football position battle to watch, No. 2: Defensive endSyracuse football preseason player file No. 3: Antwan CordySyracuse football position battle to watch, No. 3: Michael Lasker vs. Cody Conway Published on August 5, 2016 at 9:55 am Contact Jon: jrmettus@syr.edu | @jmettus Syracuse football training camp opens Saturday. The Daily Orange beat writers, Chris Libonati, Jon Mettus and Matt Schneidman, analyzed the top 10 preseason storylines and top 10 position battle heading into camp. Here are the final three of 10 player files in the series. Check out dailyorange.com and follow along here to countdown to camp.Chris SlaytonPosition: Defensive tackleYear: Redshirt sophomoreHt.: 6-4Wt.: 296Chris Slayton is the only returning defensive tackle from 2015 — he was just one of two on the roster. So it’s no surprise that he’s in line to be the starter at that spot in the coming season.He’s made a name for himself as one of the strongest players on the team and showed vast improvement prior to training camp last year, according to former defensive coordinator Chuck Bullough.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMORE PRESEASON PLAYER FILES:No. 3: Antwan CordyNo. 4: Dontae StricklandNo. 5: Zaire FranklinNo. 6: Steve Ishmael Slayton played in all 12 games during the 2015 campaign, starting five of them. He finished with 22 tackles (14 solo) and was fourth on the team with six tackles for loss.He was a standout during the spring football game with six tackles, three for loss, and a sack.Slayton is the only returning defensive lineman to record a sack last year and the Tampa 2 will require even more disruption created by Slayton and the defensive line. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

CONSIDERING POST-EBOLA LIBERIA (PART TWO): A CRISIS AS AN OPPORTUNITY

first_imgThe thrust of this second article of the series on what happens to Liberia after the Ebola crisis is on how we may turn the havoc of Ebola into a huge opportunity to make a great nation and a better people. Most human beings dread disasters, crises, and catastrophes because of the real danger and threat they pose to peace and comfort and life itself. But God Almighty can bring good out of evil (divine providence) and a crisis can be an opportunity to change for the better. The introductory article on the grave nature of the Ebola crisis observed the following key points:There is no doubt that the Ebola outbreak is affecting seriously or challenging our existence as a nation and very way o life. Ebola is forcing us to change how we greet one another, show affection to each other, and how we show love and care for our sick. Naturally we are a hospitable people who love to shake hands, hug and embrace as we welcome and cater to family, friends and strangers who come to our homes. But the Ebola menace is denying us of that basic innate instinct!Ebola is causing a lot of stigmatization among ourselves and from outsiders. The Ebola virus is so deadly that it incites fear and panic among families, places of work and play, and communities. It instantly drives away people from those who need them most. People who are suspected of having Ebola, those who have recovered from it, and those who work at Ebola treatment centers are shunned in some instances. Liberians who travel abroad and those who live in foreign parts are sometimes made to feel that they are a danger to have around and thus despised. A bishop told me while in another African country he announced that he was a Liberian and the immigration lady instantly said, “Bishop, I am afraid of you O”.Ebola is undermining the family bond and causing divisions in some instances. I hear sad stories of some family members abandoning one another for fear of Ebola. To see your wife or child or mother sick and be told not to touch the suffering person is a terrible feeling to contemplate. Someone has said that Ebola is a mean disease!Ebola is killing an already fragile economy and is doing so fast. It has slowed down economy activities and created a new wave of unemployment. All learning institutions of the country are closed. The little ones are deprived of learning.  Most of those working with our mining and forest concessions, road construction, public and private offices and on the hydro are forced to stop work and in some instances are not paid. They, their families and dependant are severely pressed to survive one way or the other. Non-food small businesses are drastically hit. The prices of food and other essentials are going up and are likely to escalate.The already much distrust between the government and its people (the Masses) is apparently increased by the Ebola crisis. A lot of people assume and speak as though for a fact that the funds allocated to fight Ebola are being squandered and are used to enrich a few against the majority. Ebola turns families and communities against one another out of fear. It causes stigmatization and leaves a permanent scar. But is this all to Ebola? Or can we turn this greatest of national challenges into something to make us better? Yes, I suggest, we can and should. How?Joshua David Stone and Gloria Excelsias assert that every crisis is an opportunity: “Any crisis is an opportunity to change direction in your life”. They reveal that the word crisis is of Greek origin and it means “a turning point in a disease.” Their conclusion is: “So a crisis is truly an opportunity for a turning point in our lives”. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks of turning our liabilities into assets. He uses the perennial example of Helen Keller who lived in the late 1880’s and early 1900’s. Made blind and deaf by a debilitating disease at the age of nine, she rose above the challenges in those days of being blind and deaf to acquiring a university degree and becoming an author, a lecturer, and an activist for the disabled. She could have mourned and blamed other people for her condition. No, rather she worked extra hard and excelled above many normal persons! Some experts in how to turn problems into opportunities speak about “turning stumbling blocks into stepping stones” in going higher rather than lower.We all need to believe in our hearts and attitudes that Ebola will be over, will be defeated. We now have an opportunity to rethink  how we think about ourselves (mindset) and live (conduct). There is a need for us to reconsider our national agenda and put a lot more emphasis on health, education, infrastructure, how we manage what we have (vast natural and other resources), and creativity in making the most of the numerous opportunities that come our way. Someone has observed that when we face inevitable changes in life, and they will come from to time, we have two choices: either to cry and give up and let the changes do whatever they will or we can use them to get better. We need to move from fine talking and planning to actual doing with all seriousness. More will be said in subsequent articles about how we can turn this Ebola crisis into a great opportunity to make us better.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more