Kaitlyn Bristowe, Artem Question Carrie Ann’s ‘DWTS’ Judging

first_imgBristowe added that she just wants to know more about the intentions behind Inaba’s commentary.“I would love to have her on the podcast, ask her a few questions. I don’t know!” the “Off the Vine” podcast host explained. “It’s always reassuring to talk to other people and have them asking those same questions because we come back and we’re like, ‘Huh?’ We’re good at accepting constructive criticism. We’re like, ‘OK, great, now let’s apply it. Thank you for the wonderful feedback.’ With this one, it’s like, ‘Huh? OK?’”Bristowe noted that the judge was also tough on season 15 Bachelorette Hannah Brown, who went on to win the mirrorball trophy in 2019.- Advertisement – Kaitlyn Bristowe and Artem Chigvintsev Question Carrie Ann Inaba Dancing With The Stars DWTS JudgingKaitlyn Bristowe and Artem Chigvintsev ABC/Kelsey McNealJudging for the wrong reasons? Kaitlyn Bristowe and Artem Chigvintsev are questioning whether Carrie Ann Inaba’s criticism of their Dancing With the Stars performances is strictly about the dance floor.“At this point, it starts being a little personal,” the 38-year-old professional dancer told Entertainment Tonight during a joint interview with the 35-year-old former Bachelorette after the Monday, November 2, episode. “I feel it’s definitely, maybe not a different standard, but I feel like it’s different expectations. I don’t know. I’m watching back the dance itself, it’s like, ‘Oh, you can kick sharper!’ Well, I can say that about everybody who dances on the show today. I don’t know. It’s really odd.”Kaitlyn Bristowe and Artem Chigvintsev Question Carrie Ann Inaba Dancing With The Stars DWTS JudgingCarrie Ann Inaba arrives at night one of the Creative Arts Emmy Awards at the Microsoft Theater on September 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP/Shutterstock- Advertisement – – Advertisement – “I just want to know where it comes from. Is it from a place where you believe in us and you want us to do better? Is it coming from a place of, ‘I was hard on Hannah and you’re another Bachelor girl?’” she asked. “Where is it coming from and how are we supposed to take it and bring it into our next rehearsal? What do you want us to channel and use from it? It’s very hard to understand that.”Kaitlyn Bristowe and Artem Chigvintsev Question Carrie Ann Inaba Dancing With The Stars DWTS JudgingArtem Chigvintsev and Kaitlyn Bristowe perform on ‘Dancing With The Stars.’ ABC/Eric McCandlessBristowe, who received an eight from Inaba for her jive to “Don’t Stop Me Now” by Queen, added that judges Derek Hough and Bruno Tonioli give more helpful feedback.- Advertisement – “Derek says things and I’m like, ‘Great! Oh my gosh, I could work on that. Let’s use that next time.’ Same with Bruno,” she said. “And when Carrie says things, I’m like, ‘What do you want us to do with that?’”During Monday’s episode, Bristowe and Chigvintsev escaped the bottom two again despite Inaba arguing that the reality TV personality performed a “lift” with Chigvintsev vs. doing her own jump during her jive. (Chrishell Stause was ultimately eliminated over Skai Jackson.) On the October 26 episode of the ABC show, Inaba suggested that Bristowe “gave up” and lost her “spirit” during her Halloween paso doble.“At this point right now, we just feel like we’re never going to make her happy. It feels really discouraging, in a sense, to come back next week,” Chigvintsev concluded after Monday’s episode. “I was literally wanting to have earmuffs and put it on top of [Kaitlyn’s] head.”Dancing With the Stars airs on ABC Mondays at 8 p.m. ET.Listen to Watch With Us to hear more about your favorite shows and for the latest TV news!last_img read more

Matthew Stafford: Detroit Lions place quarterback on reserve/COVID-19 list | NFL News

first_imgThe Detroit Lions have placed quarterback Matthew Stafford on the reserve/COVID-19 list for the second time in three months, the team announcedWednesday.Stafford was put on the list during training camp on August 1 but was reinstated a few days later after further tests revealed a false positive.Stafford, 32, will miss Sunday’s game against the Minnesota Vikings. Chase Daniel is the backup behind Stafford.- Advertisement – Stafford played just eight games last season after suffering a back injury on the final drive of Detroit’s 31-24 loss to Oakland on November 3. Stafford was put on injured reserve on December 17. Stafford had a streak of 136 straight regular-season starts snapped. – Advertisement – Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford returned a false positive in August Matthew Stafford will miss Detroit’s match against the Minnesota Vikings on Sunday with Chase Daniel filling in for the Lions; Stafford was first put on the list during training camp in August but was reinstated a few days later after it was found to be a false positive Last Updated: 04/11/20 9:51pmcenter_img Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford returned a false positive in August
Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford returned a false positive in August

Pigeon message found over a century after sent by German soldier

first_imgDominique Jardy, curator of the Linge Museum, near where the discovery was made, thinks 1910 is more likely, Le Parisien reports (in French). – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img

‘Schitt’s Creek’ Movie Hasn’t Been ‘Ruled Out’

first_img“The idea of working with these people again is still something that is kind of at the front of our brains,” he said on Tuesday. “We’ve never ruled out the possibility that, you know, we could come back in some form, be it a movie or another Christmas thing or who knows? But nothing has been ruled out, believe me. The opportunity to work with everybody again would be fantastic, because it was the best six years of my life, no question.”Eugene Levy Says 'Schitt's Creek' Movie Hasn't Been 'Ruled Out'Eugene Levy, Catherine O’Hara, Dan Levy, Noah Reid, Emily Hampshire and Annie Murphy on “Schitt’s Creek.” PopTVEarlier this year, the wildly popular series swept the 2020 Emmy Awards, taking home an unprecedented nine trophies for its final season. O’Hara, 66, Murphy, 33, and the father-son duo each received individual honors after the show went nearly unrecognized for the previous five years. After the whirlwind awards night, Daniel gushed over being able to share the moment with both his real-life family and the one he built through Schitt’s Creek.“Obviously for [my dad] to be in his 70s and to have never been nominated for an Emmy as an actor, it felt like, what a lovely time for him to win. I was just so proud. I was proud of our relationship. I was proud of the work that he did,” Daniel told Vulture in September. “The whole process just felt oddly not real. … It was just this game that eventually we’d have to give them all back.”- Advertisement – Best wishes, warmest regards! Saying goodbye to Schitt’s Creek was as hard for Eugene Levy as it was for the show’s massive fan base — but he doesn’t think it was the end of the road for the Rose family.The Canadian actor, 73, created the heartwarming comedy series with his son, Daniel Levy. Schitt’s Creek ran for six seasons starting in 2015, and its series finale aired in April. While viewers grew attached to each and every one of the show’s quirky characters, Eugene and Daniel, 37, knew they’d told their story the best they could.Eugene Levy Says 'Schitt's Creek' Movie Hasn't Been 'Ruled Out'Eugene Levy as Johnny Rose on “Schitt’s Creek.” PopTV- Advertisement – Listen to Watch With Us to hear more about your favorite shows and for the latest TV news! “We’ve said, and Daniel has said too, that we ended the show when we thought the show should have ended. It was the right time to end it,” the Serendipity star said during an interview with Fox 5 New York’s Rosanna Scotto on Tuesday, November 10. “All the stories kind of resolved themselves in as natural a way as you could, and there was no point in really extending it.”For six seasons, Eugene played the Rose family’s patriarch, Johnny, who takes over operations of a motel after being forced to move to the rural town of Schitt’s Creek. Moira Rose (Catherine O’Hara) and the pair’s children — David (Daniel) and Alexis (Annie Murphy) — leave their lives of luxury behind and find themselves falling in love with the place they learned to call home.Though the series wrapped, Eugene is hopeful that fans will get to see their favorite Schitt’s Creek characters back in action sooner rather than later.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Wisconsin lab broke Ebola rules, watchdog group says

first_imgSep 25, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW-Madison) worked on Ebola virus genetic material in a lab that lacked the required security measures, and federal agencies responsible for monitoring compliance didn’t notice the problem, a watchdog group that monitors biodefense research safety reported recently.UW-Madison’s institutional biosafety committee (IBC) wrongly allowed well-known influenza researcher Yoshihiro Kawaoka to work with Ebola genetic material in a biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) lab, though federal rules require use of a BSL-4 lab for such work, the Sunshine Project, based in Austin, Tex., reported on Sep 19. BSL-4 is the highest biosecurity rating.The university stopped the research in October 2006 after the National Institutes of Health (NIH) said a BSL-4 lab was required, even though the university disagreed, according to UW-Madison officials. The NIH was funding the research.Ebola is a highly contagious virus that causes a hemorrhagic fever and is lethal in about 50% to 90% of cases. Because the Ebola virus is so dangerous, the US government lists it as a category A bioterrorism agent. There is no vaccine or specific treatment for the disease.The Web site for Kawaoka’s lab says that in addition to work on influenza viruses, researchers are exploring the molecular pathogenesis of the Ebola virus and have established a reverse-genetics system for generating the virus, which they hope to use for vaccine production and the identification of antiviral medication targets.The Web site emphasizes that the lab has developed a novel complement system that allows researchers to study Ebola virus glycoproteins without having to do the work in a BSL-4 lab.Researcher sought lighter restrictionsThe Sunshine Project’s report makes it clear that Kawaoka and his colleagues weren’t working with live Ebola virus, but rather full-length copies of Ebola DNA (complementary DNA, or cDNA) that lacks two critical proteins that could trigger growth of an infectious virus. However, the group says that federal rules require use of a BSL-4 lab for handling Ebola virus genetic material “that has not been rendered irreversibly incapable of reproducing.”The rule violation came to light only after Kawaoka asked permission to do the work in a BSL-2 lab, which prompted Jan Klein, UW-Madison’s biological safety officer, to seek guidance from the NIH, according to e-mail messages posted on the Sunshine Project’s Web site. The NIH responded that studies with the Ebola material should be conducted in a BSL-4 lab, which UW-Madison does not have.Edward Hammond, Sunshine Project director, said in the press release that the NIH’s response amounts to disapproving its own project. “It is dismaying but not surprising that NIH’s biodefense program was funding work that violates NIH’s safety rules. The guidelines have been an unenforced afterthought for years,” he said.The violation apparently was not noted by staff from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Select Agent Program, which inspected Kawaoka’s lab, the Sunshine Project said.UW official sees inconsistent rulesIn an interview with CIDRAP News, James W. Tracy, associate dean of research in the School of Veterinary Medicine at UW-Madison, defended Kawaoka’s request to do the work in a BSL-2 lab as reasonable. “He made the request based on facts that his colleagues at the CDC are working with the same material under BSL-2 conditions,” he said. Kawaoka’s lab is part of the veterinary school.The main problem stems from differences in how research facilities interpret NIH guidelines for working with pathogens, Tracy said. Although UW-Madison disagreed with the NIH’s finding that Kawaoka’s work should be done in a BSL-4 lab, it quickly complied, he said. On Oct 28, 2006, the university halted work with the Ebola material, and Kawaoka sent the projects to a BSL-4 lab in Winnipeg, Man., where he has continued to be involved with the work.Federal officials are in a difficult position, Tracy said, because it appears that different federal agencies have different biosecurity standards.Hammond and his group are playing up inconsistencies among the government agencies to suggest that biological work is being done improperly, the public is at risk, and federal oversight is lax, Tracy said. “And I disagree,” he added.CDC official downplays riskThe National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the NIH, did not respond to a CIDRAP News request for comment on the Sunshine Project report. But Rob Weyant, director of the CDC’s Select Agent Program, told CIDRAP News that the CDC doesn’t regulate nucleic acids of the Ebola virus, which is apparently what Kawaoka’s lab was working with. “Ebola is one of the most dangerous microbes, but when you break it up and take out the nucleic acids, the nucleic acids themselves are much less hazardous,” he said.Changing cDNA from the Ebola virus into its infectious RNA form is possible, but not easy, Weyant said. When CDC inspectors toured Kawaoka’s lab they would have made sure good safety procedures were in place for work with cDNA material of the Ebola virus, he added.At the CDC, researchers do work with Ebola nucleic acids outside BSL-4 labs, Weyant said. “This is based on a risk assessment and a pretty good understanding of these viruses,” he said, adding that it was “unclear” if the agency’s researchers work with the material in BSL-2 labs.Congress to look into lab safetyThe apparent rule violations at the UW-Madison lab follow a string of other violations at four Texas universities that also were exposed recently by the Sunshine Project. In late June the CDC ordered a biodefense research laboratory at Texas A&M University to stop all work on select agents and toxins while the agency investigated reports of lab workers infected with the category B bioterrorism agents Brucella and Coxiella burnetti. A week ago the Sunshine Project revealed that three University of Texas facilities recently had lab accidents with dangerous pathogens, including the agents of anthrax, tularemia, and shigellosis.Concerns about safety at US biodefense labs come amid ongoing foot-and-outh (FMD) disease outbreaks in the United Kingdom that health officials say were linked to release of the virus from flooded drain pipes at a facility in Pirbright that houses an FMD vaccine producer and a government research institute.Safety breaches at US biodefense labs have also caught the attention of lawmakers. The US House Committee on Energy and Commerce announced it would hold a hearing on Oct 4 to explore the risks associated with the rising number of BSL-3 and BSL-4 labs in the United States, according to a Sep 21 news release from the committee.Rep John Dingell, D-Mich., chairman of the committee, said construction of biodefense labs has surged over the past several years, funded in part by the federal government.”Yet, little information is available about the number of labs being operated in the US and whether they are safely run,” he said. “While the research conducted at these labs is certainly valuable, we must make sure that it does not pose a risk to the public health.”See also:Sep 19 CIDRAP News story “Biosafety lapses reported at 3 more Texas labs”Sep 5 CIDRAP News story “CDC details problems at Texas A&M biodefense lab”last_img read more

USDA modifies E coli testing rules for Canadian beef

first_img Eamich said no E coli contamination or other “product failures” have been found in the expanded testing program so far. The department is no longer requiring that importers hold shipments of Canadian meat until pathogen testing is completed, Amanda Eamich of the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) reported. However, she said increased inspections and testing will continue. Tests take 3 to 7 days, depending on the pathogen, officials have said. A spike in E coli–related meat recalls this year prompted the USDA in October to vow to take a number of steps to combat the problem. As of Oct 23, the agency said E coli in ground beef had sparked 15 recalls, eight of which involved illnesses. In 2006 there were just eight such recalls, none involving illnesses, the agency said. The USDA has also been inspecting the Rancher’s Beef plant and several other Canadian meat facilities that were previously flagged for problems or are similar to Rancher’s Beef in their operations. The dropping of the requirement to hold meat during testing “was due to the preliminary findings of our audits and the first week or so of testing,” Eamich told CIDRAP News. “We had previously said we would reassess after we got the preliminary data.” Eamich said the USDA has long had guidelines recommending that companies hold meat until test results come back, “but it’s not something we require,” she said. She added that there are no proposals to change that. See also: The expanded USDA program, according to the Nov 8 announcement, includes increased inspections of Canadian meat, poultry, and pasteurized egg products; more testing of raw ground beef for E coli O157:H7; the initiation of E coli testing of beef trim, boxed beef, and certain other cuts of meat that had not been tested before; and increased testing of ready-to-eat products for Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella. A Nov 18 report in USA Today said the agency might require companies to hold meat during testing. Nov 8 CIDRAP News story “USDA vows to double inspections of Canadian meat” Mark Dopp, an American Meat Institute (AMI) official, said large companies already hold meat during testing, according to the USA Today report. He said more companies, but not all, embraced that practice after USDA and AMI began recommending it several years ago. Nov 21, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has modified its program of increased testing and inspection of Canadian meat, after finding no problems in the first week or so, a USDA official said today. On a related issue, Eamich said the USDA is not considering requiring American meat companies to hold meat until pathogen testing is completed, contrary to a recent news report. The USDA announced Nov 8 it would roughly double its inspections and testing of Canadian meat and poultry products. The move came after beef trim from a Canadian packing plant, Rancher’s Beef of Balzac, Alta., was implicated in an Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to ground beef from Topps Meat Co. of Elizabeth, N.J. Topps went out of business after recalling more than 21 million pounds of ground beef in September. Oct 23 CIDRAP News story “USDA announces plans to reduce E coli contamination in ground beef”last_img read more

Four countries report avian flu outbreaks

first_imgDec 12, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Poland, Russia, Vietnam, and Saudi Arabia reported new outbreaks of the deadly H5N1 avian influenza in birds today, according to news reports.Poland has new outbreaks at two sites well separated from the five outbreaks reported recently in two areas northwest of Warsaw, according to a Reuters report.The disease cropped up at a small farm near Elblag, near the Gulf of Gdansk in northeastern Poland, the story said. Ewa Lech, Poland’s chief veterinary officer, calling the site “an entirely new location,” said the farm has about 40 birds, according to the report.Lech also confirmed a report that the virus was found in wild birds near the town of Orneta, according to the story. A separate Reuters story said the birds were a stork and two buzzards, all of which died. Maps show that Orneta lies roughly 30 miles east of Elblag, and both are approximately 100 miles from Plock.Poland’s recent series of outbreaks—its first in domestic birds—began Nov 30 at two turkey farms near Plock, about 60 miles northwest of Warsaw. On Dec 8 and 10 the disease killed laying hens on two large farms near Zuromin, according to Poland’s Dec 11 report to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Zuromin is about 50 kilometers (31 miles) north of Plock, according to Reuters.As of Dec 10, the OIE report said, 1,181 birds had died of avian flu in the Polish outbreaks and another 4,258 had been destroyed. But the affected farms had a total of about 510,000 birds that were at risk and destined to be culled, the report said.Meanwhile, a government official said today that an H5N1 outbreak on a farm in southern Russia has killed more than 35,000 chickens over the past 5 days, according to an Associated Press (AP) report from Rostov-on-Don.Sergei Kozhemyaka, Rostov regional emergency services officer, said more than a half million remaining chickens on the farm would be destroyed to stop the virus, said the story.The last previous H5N1 outbreak in Russia was at a poultry farm in the Krasnodar region in September, the story noted. The virus also killed hundreds of domestic birds in the Moscow area in February.In Saudi Arabia, the agriculture ministry today announced an H5N1 outbreak at an egg production farm south of Riyadh, according to the Kuwait News Agency. The ministry said the farm, in the Alsahba area in Al-Kharj governorate, has about 400,000 hens.Saudi Arabia has had a series of avian flu outbreaks in the Riyadh vicinity that began Nov 12, according to previous reports.In Vietnam, which has battled many outbreaks this year, the virus has recurred in the northern province of Bac Giang, according to a Xinhua report published today. The virus has killed more than 1,000 ducks in the Viet Yen and Yen Dung districts, said the story, which cited the newspaper Saigon Liberation as its source.Vietnam’s latest report to the OIE, filed Nov 12, says the country had had 106 outbreaks for the year to that point, with 64,524 birds destroyed in control efforts.See also: OIE reports on 2007 outbreaks in Poland and Vietnamlast_img read more

Enacted bill includes pandemic, food safety money

first_imgMar 12, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – In passing a huge spending bill this week to cover the next 6 months, Congress approved pandemic preparedness funds that had been proposed by former President Bush and increased appropriations for food safety, according to a health advocacy group.The $410 billion bill was passed by the Senate Feb 10, following earlier House approval, and signed by President Barack Obama yesterday. It funds numerous government agencies for the rest of fiscal year 2009, which ends Sep 30.The measure includes more than $700 million in pandemic spending that Bush had sought for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), but none of that is for state and local public health agencies, according to Richard Hamburg, government affairs director for the nonprofit group Trust for America’s Health.The bill also includes $648.7 million for food safety efforts at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which represents a $141 million increase from the 2008 level, Hamburg reported. In addition, Congress approved $971.5 million for the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), an increase of $41 million over the 2008 amount, he said.The HHS pandemic funding includes $425 million for vaccine production capacity, $42 million for production of egg-based vaccines, and $40 million for medical countermeasures for HHS staff members and contractors, according to Hamburg.Also included is $156 million for ongoing pandemic-related activities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which is $1.4 million more than the agency received in 2008, he said. In addition, the office of the HHS secretary is to receive $78 million for pandemic activities, up from $75 million in 2008, he said.Hamburg said he hadn’t seen the breakdown of amounts for other agencies, but he expects that the FDA and the National Institutes of Health will get about the same amounts of pandemic-related funding as in 2008—$38 million and $34 million, respectively.Also included in the legislation is $3 million for research by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) on flu transmission and respiratory protection from flu viruses, Hamburg reported. The bill calls for NIOSH to evaluate filtering facepiece respirators and other types of personal protective equipment (PPE) for healthcare workers and to work on designing the next generation of PPE, he said.He noted that the allocation follows an Institute of Medicine report in 2008 that cited a critical need for more information on airborne transmission of flu. He didn’t think the money was part of the Bush administration’s 2009 budget proposal.On the food safety front, the $141 million increase for the FDA goes mainly to the agency’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN), according to Hamburg. Overall, the FDA is getting a $325 million budget increase from 2008, which raises its total funding for 2009 to nearly $2 billion, he said.A CFSAN spokesman said today he had no information yet on how the increased funding for food safety will be spent.As for the proposed 2010 budget, the Obama administration has released only a general outline so far; said Hamburg: “We expect to see more detailed information on pandemic [funding] in early April.”Pandemic preparedness advocates had hoped Congress would include pandemic funds for state and local health departments in the economic stimulus bill passed in February. The House approved $900 million for that purpose, but it was stripped from the final bill.See also:Feb 13 CIDRAP News story “Stimulus bill headed for passage minus pandemic funds”last_img read more

Egyptian H5N1 cases prompt speculation about silent infections

first_imgApr 8, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The recent series of H5N1 avian influenza cases in Egyptian children yet very few in adults has raised concern that some Egyptians may be getting infected without getting sick, according to a Reuters news report published today.John Jabbour, a World Health Organization (WHO) emerging diseases specialist based in Cairo, said the Egyptian government and the WHO are planning a study to find out if subclinical or asymptomatic cases have been occurring, according to the story.Jabbour said the occurrence of asymptomatic cases would be worrisome because it could give the undetected virus more time to mutate in human hosts, Reuters reported.”If there is any subclinical case in Egypt, the aim is to treat immediately to stop the reproduction of the virus,” he told Reuters. “Because whether [through] mutation or reassortment, this will lead to the pandemic strain.”The story said that all but two of the 11 Egyptians infected with H5N1 this year have been children under age 3 (the official WHO count for Egypt reached 12 today). In the same period last year, most of the seven Egyptian case-patients were adults and older children, the report said.Jabbour said the string of cases in children without similar cases in adults had prompted the questions whether adults were being infected without falling ill.He said the Egyptian study would involve testing the blood of people who were potentially exposed to infected birds but had not gotten sick.Tim Uyeki, MD, a medical epidemiologist in the Influenza Division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told CIDRAP News that limited studies in several countries over the past few years have found relatively little serologic evidence of asymptomatic or unrecognized cases of H5N1 virus infection.When the H5N1 virus first infected humans in Hong Kong in 1997, there were two studies in which investigators looked for H5N1 antibodies in people who had potentially been exposed to the virus, Uyeki said. One study focused on 293 poultry cullers, of whom only nine (3%) were found to have H5N1 antibodies, indicating past infection. In the other study, involving 1,525 poultry workers, an estimated 10% had antibodies.More recent studies “have either found no evidence of H5N1 virus infection or very low seroprevalence of H5N1 antibodies, around 1% or less, among different exposed populations,” Uyeki said. “Since H5N1 virus strains continue to evolve, there’s a continued need for these studies in people who have contact with poultry in countries where H5N1 virus strains are circulating in birds, since the risk of transmission to exposed persons could change.”Uyeki also noted that subclinical infection with seasonal influenza virus is known to occur. “But how that relates to H5N1 is unclear,” he said.See also: Jan 25 2008 CIDRAP News story “Cambodian study hints at subclinical H5N1 cases”last_img read more